Home improvements will help you sell your house.

Today’s homebuyers are less attracted to cosmetic aesthetics and more to a home’s bones, mechanicals and structural improvements

Homebuyers—regardless of generation—want a move-in-ready home. That may sound like an old song, but looking forward there’s a new verse. Move-in-ready is less about trending pop and sizzle in the kitchen and bathroom and more about what’s going on behind, under and over those cupboards and fixtures.

According to a recent consumer survey by homebuilder Taylor Morrison, 62 percent of homebuyers most want energy efficiency and 56 percent seek easy maintenance.

Are homebuyers willing to pay for what they want? In most cases, yes, says Craig Webb, editor of Remodeling magazine and its annual Cost vs. Value Report. The 2018 Report, not yet released, cites at least a 10 percent drop in return on investment (ROI) for upscale remodeling projects. “The highest resale payback is in projects that involve replacing what’s broken, inefficient or outdated,” he says.

Here are several key areas where you can guide sellers through home décor and design trends, attract homebuyers and profitably close more sales.

Get FIXated
“Between Pinterest and HGTV, many sellers get caught up in visually preparing their home for sale,” says Lilli Schipper, CRS, REALTOR®, with Fort Lauderdale-based Island and Resort Realty. “Yet they forget about outdated mechanical and structural issues, which could come up during an inspection and end up killing the deal. Pre-listing inspections can sometimes provide more value than staging.”

Based on 2017 data, here are the top-10 home improvements in terms of ROI, according to Remodeling magazine’s 2018 Cost vs. Value Report:
1. Garage Door Replacement- 98.3%
2. Manufactured Stone Veneer- 97.1%
3. Deck Addition (wood)-82.8%
4.Minor Kitchen Remodel-81.1%
5. Siding Replacement-76.7%
6.Window Replacement (vinyl)-74.3%
7. Universal Design Bathroom-70.6%
8. Bathroom Remodel-70.1%
9.Window Replacement (wood)-69.5%
10. Roofing Replacement-68.4%

Mechanical and structural improvements may not be the sexiest home trend, but it’s hot—and getting hotter. “In 2017, the payback for these kinds of projects averaged 74 percent. In 2018, it’s up to 76 percent,” Webb says.

Driving home this point, the 2017 Remodeling Impact Report, a joint study from the National Association of the Remodeling Industry (NARI) and the National Association of REALTORS® (NAR), gives a new roof a 109 percent ROI. The 2017 Cost vs. Value Report gives top honors to what’s going on under that roof, with a 107.7 percent payback for fiberglass attic insulation.

Debra Pitell-Hauge, CRS, broker-REALTOR® with Michael Saunders & Company, headquartered in Longboat Key, Florida, says it’s about fixing functional obsolescence. That can mean an energy efficient HVAC system, new windows and doors, or the ability to withstand almost anything that Mother Nature dishes out. “Here on Florida’s west coast, buyers want hurricane-impact glass. I’ve seen people buy their second-choice home because it’s hurricane proof.”

Curb your enthusiasm
“Curb appeal is more important than ever,” Pitell-Hauge says. “It’s partly because most people start their search online. So first they see the front of the house and then they move on to interior photographs.”
While every REALTOR® knows the importance of curb appeal, Webb emphasizes that exterior project ROIs have been outpacing interior projects for a while now—and are not expected to slow down any time soon. These exterior improvements include landscaping and fresh paint as well as new doors, windows, siding and roof.

Open floor plan 2.0
For years, many homebuyers wanted an open floor plan, with a seamless flow from kitchen to dining room to family room. Homebuyers still want an open floor plan—but now they also want flexibility. Or, as Taylor Morrison’s survey reports, 58 percent of today’s homebuyers want a floor plan that can be personalized.
Visually “explaining” an open floor plan’s flexibility ramps up the importance of professional staging, says Linda Rike, CRS, broker-REALTOR®, with Linda Rike Real Estate and serving Crystal Coast–Carteret County, North Carolina.

“A personalized floor plan implies creating living spaces where you want them to be. For example, in my market, the open formal dining room is making a comeback, so I might take an open space and stage a breakfast nook and a formal dining area—rather than one space for all meals.”

Or you may want to stage an open space with less family room and more home office space. Depending on your market, you might stage a smaller dining area and introduce room for a mixologist’s dream bar cart. It’s a visual solution for the increasing number of homebuyers who want to share the trending “cocktail experience” with friends.

Generally, stagers charge $300 to $600 for a consultation. Regardless of staging price, the payback can be substantial. According to the 2017 Profile of Home Staging report by the National Association of REALTORS®, 77 percent of buyers’ agents say staging a home makes it easier for a buyer to visualize the property as a future home and about one-third of buyer’s agents feel that staging increases the dollar value offered from 1 to 5 percent when compared to similar unstaged homes on the market.

A warm welcome
Houzz predicts that 2018 home design and décor will go to bold, warm colors—like ruby red, grays with a hint of brown, and rich, earthy shades of camel, rust, tobacco and burnt yellow. Vibrant floral patterns are expected to bloom from ceiling to floor. Not a warm color fan? Sherwin-Williams named Oceanside SW 6496 as its 2018 Color of the Year, describing the cool, deep tone as a rich blue that collides with jewel-toned green.

These colors are fabulous, but potential ROI disasters if permanently applied to walls, floors, fixtures or cabinets while preparing a house for sale, says Kathy Novak, CRS, REALTOR®, with Howard Hanna Real Estate serving Northeast Ohio. “Use color trends for furniture, bathroom towels and shower curtains, and kitchen knick-knacks, but not for anything that’s permanent.”

Specifically addressing walls, anything bolder than warm gray, warm beige, or better yet, a combo called warm greige, can immediately shut a buyer down, Rike adds. “The first thing that pops in their mind is: ‘I’ll have to spend a fortune to repaint the whole house.’ With that, they move on to the next property.”

Counter intelligence
Yesteryear’s stark, all-white kitchens are warming up with vibrant pops of color, dark wood floors, dramatic statement tile work, black appliances and countertops created from a myriad of materials. However, Schipper says, these are pricey, upscale trends meant for personal enjoyment—but not investment. “If you put $80,000 into a new kitchen, do it for yourself and enjoy! Just don’t expect to get it back on resale value.”

The 2017 Cost vs. Value Report and the 2017 Remodeling Impact Report agree, both giving a major, upscale kitchen remodel a slim ROI of only 62 percent.

The general consensus is to keep kitchen updates down to a new granite countertop and perhaps a new sink. As Pitell-Hauge explains, “In high-priced markets, I believe buyers will tear the kitchen out and put in what they want, regardless of what you’ve done. In mid-priced markets, buyers won’t likely be able to afford the additional cost to cover a major kitchen remodel.”

Floor it
Hardwood flooring continues to attract homebuyers. Popular alternatives range from distressed or reclaimed wood for a rustic look to sophisticated dark hardwoods stained sleek black to traditional oak, which remains a perennial fan favorite. However, with more trends than ever, it’s tough to know which look will grab a homebuyer’s second glance.

For that reason, it’s often better to professionally clean existing carpet or refinish existing hardwood floors. The 2017 Remodeling Impact Report gives refinishing a solid thumbs up, citing a 100 percent ROI.

The projects attracting homebuyers aren’t necessarily inexpensive, but they typically cost less than a luxury kitchen remodel or bathroom addition, Webb says. That means sellers need to invest less to prepare a home for sale and will likely recoup more—if not all—of their investment. As for sellers who think they need to present an upscale trend-worthy home, well, that only happens on HGTV. 

BY DONNA SHRYER, https://crs.com/resources/connect-blog

These Tips come from Charlotte’s most experienced realtor, Dupont Real Estate. Call us when you are ready to buy or sell a home. We are here for you.

Shop for Loans

Shop for Loans- it is possible

Over 50% of home buyers don’t shop for loans to find the best interest rate for their mortgage.

While a buyer would rarely purchase the first home they look at, they will accept the rate and terms offered by only one lender. While the borrower and the property affect the rate and terms that a lender may offer, not all lenders offer the same terms and rates to the same buyer. Shop for loans- before choosing a mortgage loan- Charlotte realtor tips

I advise my clients that shopping around to compare rate and terms for a mortgage is a reasonable exercise considering that a half percent less interest rate could not only lower the payment but the cumulative interest that is paid while that loan is outstanding. Remember to shop for loans before making your decision

When you are ready to buy or sell your home, contact one of the most experienced Realtors in town- Dupont Real Estate.

(Taken from crs.com)

Outdoor kitchens are a interest of a lot of homeowners. Homeowners continue to cook up outdoor kitchens that in some cases rival their indoor counterparts. Yet some experts insist the popularity of outdoor kitchens has boiled over.

Belgard, a maker of outdoor living products, says souped-up outdoor kitchens include professional-grade appliances (particularly refrigerators and dishwashers), numerous cooking surfaces, bar-style seating and brick ovens, while Trex Co., another maker of outdoor living products, adds cooking islands and built-in sinks to the mix.outdoor kitchen DIY tips from your Charlotte realtor- Dupont Real Estate

“The whole concept of outdoor cooking has grown far beyond a backyard barbecue,” design expert Paul Lafrance, one of the stars of HGTV’s ‘Decked Out,” says in a Trex news release. “Homeowners are hungry for fully appointed kitchens with features like integrated trash bins, ice chests and cabinetry that add convenience and luxury.”

In a 2015 survey by the Hearth Patio & Barbecue Association, 35 percent of people who have outdoor kitchens said they planned to undertake upgrades within the next three years. Outdoor furniture purchases, deck/patio improvements and garden/landscaping improvements topped the list of planned upgrades.

“Outdoor kitchens make life easier for those who enjoy grilling their meals and entertaining outdoors, making your deck or patio an extension of your family’s living space. It also can enhance your home’s resale value,” the National Association of Home Builders says.

As you’d expect, the National Outdoor Kitchen & Fireplace Association is bullish about outdoor kitchens.

“The outdoor kitchen has become one of the most popular home improvements for consumers across America,” the association says, “and just about every consumer we speak to is either planning on having an outdoor kitchen built or it’s at the top of their wish list for a future backyard project.”

A 2013 survey for Casual Living and HGTV showed that 4 percent of U.S. consumers had outdoor kitchens, but it’s likely that number has grown in the meantime. The 2013 research found that outdoor kitchens most often are owned by wealthier, older Americans.

Ian Phi, publisher of the Patio Resource website, says the popularity of outdoor kitchens peaked a few years ago and now is waning. As a matter of fact, a December 2015 survey by the National Home Builders Association indicates that builders expect outdoor kitchens to be one of the least likely features incorporated into new single-family homes in 2016.

Phi says some homeowners have discovered that they don’t use their outdoor kitchens all that much, and that these kitchens are yet another area they must clean and maintain. If outdoor kitchens aren’t maintained well, he says, birds, insects and other pests might come calling.

“Most homeowners want to have some planned outdoor space,” Phi says. “It could be something simple, perhaps just a small area to put an outdoor table and a grill. Other people want to go all out and have a fire pit area, lots of custom-built seating, extensive landscaping and maybe even an outdoor kitchen.”

John Egan is editor in chief at LawnStarter, an Austin, Texas-based company that helps people find, schedule, pay for and manage lawn care services.

DIY backyard ideas

Remember backyards? Those things we’ve been ignoring for the past four months? They’re back! They might not be looking as sharp as they did before the snowfalls, but we’ve got some rad DIY backyard projects to bring it back to life.

1. Ground-level trampoline
Do you live in constant fear of your kids falling off the trampoline? Honestly—parenting fears aside—trampolines might be fun, but they’re pretty ugly structures. Well, with these sunken trampolines, you’ll never have to worry about either of those things. Just dig a hole, place your trampoline, and voila!

2. The only thing better than a tree house
Looking for a treehouse alternative, something that looks nice but offered a little distance from the main house? What about a garden house, originally for children to play in and now a perfect woman cave. Moral of the story: your treehouse need not be on a tree.

3. Tin can lanterns
This project is both DIY and eco-friendly (because recycling is good). They are easy to make, and will elevate your backyard to the next level. It’s a win-win!

4. How about some outdoor Tic Tac Toe?
Not only is Tic Tac Toe the best (especially when you’re super good at it), but it also scores high in decorative value. With little effort, you’ll come across as cool and tasteful.

5. Vertical garden
Since we’ve already installed a sunken trampoline, a play house/woman cave, and have a Tic Tac Toe board lying around, how about we go for space efficiency with this one? A vertical garden can cover any and all walls. It looks good, it smells nice, and you can eat it! That is the best of all the worlds, if you ask me.

6. Last but not least, a fire pit
If you can’t roast s’mores in your backyard, is it even a backyard? I’m going to go with no. This DIY project costs only $60 to make, but look how fancy. This fire pit will make the perfect centerpiece for the intense fantasy backyard we just built together. (Also: s’mores.)

An awesome backyard is just one DIY away.

When you are ready to buy or sell your home in the Charlotte/Lake Norman area, contact Dupont Real Estate. We are here for you.

Moving and buying a home
Moving and buying a home

Image via Pixabay

Moving and buying a home is a fun and exciting time for your family, but your dog might not feel the same way. House hunting and listing your own home on the market mean disruptions to your pet’s usual schedule, which can be stressful for pets and owners alike. However, there are a few things you can do to help the move go smoothly for everyone involved.

Selling

Showcasing your home to potential buyers means a lot of strangers coming in and out of your house. This can be overwhelming even for people-loving dogs, and your buyers won’t appreciate a dog jumping, barking, or getting in the way as they try to look around. In fact, pets can deter some buyers from even considering your home. Scheduling a dog walker during showings keeps your dog happy and helps you attract the widest possible pool of buyers. If you need to get out of the house too, turn it into an opportunity for quality time with your pet by heading to a local ​dog park​.

Speaking of buyers that aren’t fans of pets, you should also make sure your house doesn’t have any lingering pet odors before showing it. People often don’t notice odors in their own home, so
ask a friend for a second opinion or schedule a carpet and upholstery cleaning just to be safe. According to HomeAdvisor, in Charlotte, NC, you can expect to pay ​$116-$204​ to have your carpets cleaned, and it will likely take around 4 hours to complete. This is a very small price to pay to ensure you’re making a great impression to potential buyers.

Be diligent about sweeping, vacuuming, and cleaning pet waste out of the yard, and consider boarding your pet for the days leading up to a big showing or open house so it’s easier to keep the house clean.
Buying It’s fun to look for homes for sale while you’re out walking your dog. Rather than risking upsetting realtors or homeowners by bringing your dog to a showing he doesn’t want to be at anyway, leave pets at home when viewing houses. If you do spot the perfect house while out with your pet, jot down the address and realtor’s information so you can follow up.

Moving

After everything is closed and settled, there’s one more step before your move is over. Unfortunately, it’s also the most ​stressful​ part for your dog. Pets don’t react well to changes at home, and packing up the house is certain to cause some anxiety. Try to pack gradually, starting with small things, so as to not set off your pet’s alarms. When the movers are due to arrive, schedule pet sitting so your dog is blissfully unaware of the action until it’s over.

In the new house, you may need to set up a safe area for your dog while he acclimates to the new environment. The ​ASPCA​ recommends putting his bed, food, and toys in a single room and provide plenty of affection until he’s feeling confident in his surroundings. This could take a couple of days or longer depending on your pet’s personality. Once you’ve settled in, take some time to explore your new neighborhood with your dog, and keep an eye out for some of Charlotte’s best dog-friendly ​restaurants​ and ​breweries​.

Don’t have a pet yet but planning on getting one? There’s no reason not to factor future pets into your house hunting. Look for a house with a fenced yard, scratch-resistant flooring, and other ​pet-friendly features​ to make life with a pet a little bit easier.

Whether you have a house full of dogs or are planning for your first pet, it’s important to consider how you’ll navigate the responsibilities of pet ownership while coordinating a move. These tips will help keep everyone happy throughout the process, yourself included.

Article provided by Medina at DogEtiquette.info

Remodeling and your home

Remodeling and your home- news from Dupont Real EstateThe expected tenure of homeowners in a home continues to increase, according to the latest Profile of Home Buyers and Sellers. Last year, the expected tenure was 12 years – this year, it jumped to 15. And, with tightened inventory in many markets, people are staying put in their homes for longer. As a result, remodeling one’s current home is an increasingly popular option for those who want their dream home, but are unable or unwilling to move.

The 2017 Remodeling Impact report shows that remodeling can bring more enjoyment to a home, and that certain projects have high returns both in terms of the joy they bring to the homeowner, as well as the amount of expenses that are recouped when the home is sold.

The projects that yield the most joy and recoup the most expenses might come as a surprise. According to REALTOR® respondents, the number one project is a complete kitchen renovation. The top reason homeowners renovate the kitchen is for better functionality and livability, according to 44 percent of respondents. When the project is completed, 91 percent of respondents have both a greater desire to be in the home and have a greater sense of enjoyment when they are at home. Overall, a kitchen renovation receives a 10 out of 10 Joy Score and REALTORS® estimate that $40,000 of the cost can be recovered at resale—approximately 62 percent of the estimated cost.

The second-most popular project is a kitchen upgrade. Like the complete kitchen renovation, upgrading worn-out surfaces, finishes and materials is high on the list of reasons to undertake the project – in fact, it’s the number one reason, at 42 percent. When the project is completed, 81 percent report experiencing a greater desire to be in the home and feeling a major sense of accomplishment when they think about the project. Slightly less have an increased sense of enjoyment when they are in the home at 76 percent, but the project overall has a Joy Score of 9.6 out of 10. REALTORS® estimate that $20,000 of the cost can be recovered at resale—57 percent of the estimated cost. The third project on the list of most popular projects is a bathroom renovation. Forty percent undertake the project for better functionality and livability, while 38 percent want to upgrade worn-out surfaces, finishes and materials. When the project is completed, 78 percent feel a major sense of accomplishment when they think about the project. The project has a Joy Score of 9.6 out of 10, and REALTORS® estimate that $15,000 of the cost can be recovered at resale—50 percent of the estimated cost.

By Meredith Dunn, National Association of REALTORS®

When was the last time you took a close look at your home’s foundation? If you find yourself racking your brain trying to determine whether it was last spring, or two summers ago, it’s definitely been too long. From simple tasks to time-consuming projects, homeowners often don’t have the time—or the space on their to-do list—to add yet another item. However, when it comes to your home’s foundation, there’s no time like the present.Homes Foundation- DIY tips from your Charlotte Realtor

A pro-active approach to caring for your home’s foundation is not only economical, it can also save you a lot of money—and headaches—down the road.

1. Check the drainage around your home by ensuring that gutters and spouts drain away from the foundation.

2. While plumbing leaks under the house foundation are not uncommon, homeowners can have a plumbing pressure test done to make sure there are no leaks under the slab.
3. The ground moisture around the home’s perimeter should remain as constant as possible. Periodic use of a sprinkler system and soaker hoses in the summer time is recommended, but can also be done in the winter if the weather is dry.

If you’re pressed for time, contact a reputable foundation repair company to have an inspection conducted inside and outside the house. Most of the solutions are affordable and extremely important to the well-being of the structure.

Source: www.premierfoundationrepair.com

couple painting interior 10 tips to sell your home

Staging your home to sell

If you want your home to sell fast. decorating and decluttering to “set the stage” for potential buyers should be at the top of your to-do list. Staging your home showcases its best features and helps buyers visualize their families in the space. Here are 10 tips to get you started.

  • Apply a fresh coat of paint in neutral
    colors. It’s also a good idea to remove
    outdated wallpaper as potential buyers may not
    share your design taste.
  • Open blinds and drapes to let in natural
    light. Replace or remove old blinds and clear
    your light fixtures of dust and cobwebs.
  • Make repairs where needed. Fix running
    toilets, squeaky doors, chipped paint, broken
    fixtures and anything else that will distract from the
    desirability of your home.
  • Remove all personal items and photos. You
    want a buyer to picture his or her family in the
    space, not yours. Store the kids’ toys away, too.
  • Clean inside and out. Mop, dust, vacuum,
    repeat. No one wants to move into a house
    with a moldy shower or sticky refrigerator. If you
    can’t handle the cleaning yourself, hire a company
    to do it for you.
  • Spruce up landscaping. Plant flowers, trim
    bushes, weed the garden, mow the lawn
    and fix any unsightly cracks in your driveway
    or sidewalk.colorful-garden-and-beautiful-landscape-staging-home-for-sale
  • Deel utter your space. Clean up rooms,
    closets, cabinets, drawers and bathrooms,
    especially bathrooms. Stow away your personal
    hygiene items and medications as well.
  • Remove odors. Clean and deodorize, paying
    special attention to bathrooms and places
    where pets and kids congregate. Use baking
    soda and lemon to remove sink and garbage
    disposal odors.
  • Replace worn out furniture and carpet.
    Remove any furniture that is too big for
    your space, as large pieces can make a room
    look smaller.
  • Update lighting. Dark homes can appear
    dreary. Insta lling new pendant lights and
    ceiling fan fixtures can make a big difference when
    it comes to selling your home.light fixture install

 

Being smart about buying a new home is just as important as being clever about selling your old one, and we are here to help. We are your Real Estate Resource. If you are looking to buy or sell a home in Lake Norman, Charlotte, or surrounding areas anywhere in NC, SC, or VA. We are here to assist you! Contact Us.

Mistakes Sellers Make

Mistakes sellers make can be avoided. When choosing a Realtor to sell your home, take time to pick one with an excellent reputation for listing homes. Choosing the wrong one will undoubtedly lead to financial and emotional headaches.

Here are several things to consider when choosing a Realtor so that mistakes can be avoided:

1. Hiring a Friend or Family

Choosing a Realtor, simply because she is your neighbor or family can be a very bad idea. Your top priority should be to sell your home for the best price as quickly as possible. By contracting with someone based on a relationship without scrutinizing out their credentials or references, the seller could be tied up in a contract that is not beneficial to them. If something goes awry during the process, it can cause conflict and can ruin or damage the relationship.

2. Listing with an agent who gives you the highest selling price

Choosing a Realtor because they suggest the highest price is a common mistake made by the home seller. You should hire someone who can give a strong market analysis to help you determine a reasonable price for your home and to avoid overpricing. It is important that your home is priced right to attract potential buyers.

3. Choose a Realtor based on Commission

Agents and real estate companies put up their own funds to market and advertise your home. Marketing and advertising will cost them money. So the lower the commission, the less incentive for an agent. A full service agent earning a full commission will often drop everything to handle any challenges that come along.  If a Realtor agrees to a lower commission with very little or no resistance at all, imagine how strong their negotiations will be on your behalf when you receive an offer. The seller needs to have more information about the Realtor’s experience and success and not rely solely on the fact of lower commission.

4. Hiring the so-called “neighborhood expert”

An agent living in the neighborhood doesn’t necessarily mean that they are better equipped to sell your home than someone who does not. Knowledge of the local market isn’t only acquired by living in the immediate neighborhood. A full-time realtor can get up to speed on a neighborhood fairly quickly by extensive research. Remember, selling a home is not location dependent it is about having the business skills.

5. Picking from an Open House

Open houses basic function is to connect the Realtor to other prospective clients. Yes, open houses can sell homes, but the percentage is so low. It is more of a way for the listing agent to advertise and to pick additional clients. Good agents know better than to pin all their selling effort on an open house. They should use their time in more effective marketing methods, not directly to the public but to other agents. By getting other agents interested in your home, your listing agent multiplies your sales force beyond just one individual.

Final Thought:

When choosing a Realtor, find out about their experience and success rate. Check their references and their satisfaction rate from their previous customer. As a seller, you have the right to choose the best person to fit your individual needs. Selling a home can be challenging, but with the help of a reliable Realtor, you can avoid making mistakes and reap the rewards of your sale.

We welcome your feedback and comments. We are also able to give you a FREE analysis of the current value of your home. Please CLICK HERE to request or call 704-510-0099

 

Help Sell Your House

A home is not only a place to reside but can also serve as a great investment. How can a homeowner make a return on their investment without breaking the bank at the same time maximizing their profit?

Below are some DIY tips that a homeowner can implement without going broke and can be done with little money.

Painting will help sell your house

Help Sell Your House

Putting up a fresh coat of paint can make a home seem new again. However, eye- catching paint job is a big no-no. When choosing paint colors, your best bet is to stick with neutral colors that will appeal to the greatest range of buyers. Yes, bland colors like white, beige or light grey doesn’t really beg for attention. But the point is you don’t want the potential buyers to see your personality on display, rather you want them to see a blank canvass that will allow them to envision making a space on their own. You don’t have to repaint the entire house though prior putting it on the market, you can redo one or two rooms. Kitchen and bathrooms are two main areas that needs complete paint job given the high traffic they see.

Floors

Prior to showing, mop the floors or vacuum clean your carpets. Refresh your hardwood floors and clean and polish vinyl tiles. You don’t need to replace them unless completely needed. Replacing it is a costly expense that will not add greater value to the home. First impression are lasting, so pay attention to the entrance area, you don’t want a potential buyer to walk in to see a floor strewn with boots and shoes.

Minor Repairs

It is important to make minor repairs prior listing, such as fixing sagging shelves and cracked clothes rod, replacing cracked siding boards or repointing brick walls. Check the operation of every door and window and be sure that all light fixtures and wall switches work. Making repairs ahead of time will reduce the chances of a potential buyer backing out of the deal or offer less money for the house.

Landscaping

First impression is formed the instant a potential buyer pulls into the driveway or clicks on its image on a web site. So make sure to create a good first impression by keeping your front lawn mowed and your garden weed-free. Tidy up shrubs and remove dead and broken limbs from trees. You can also add flower garden or some raised beds for a vibrant green space not only making sure that your yard looks better but also appeals to any buyer with a green thumb.

Backyard cleaning will help sell your house

Backyard is important to home buyers today, it gives them privacy from other homes. Prior selling you can paint your fence or hide it by installing a privacy screen or vertical garden. You can do also plantscaping using potted plants to create layers and visual excitement.

Try to avoid expensive renovations unless they are absolutely needed. In the end, buyers also have their own plans for renovating, so keep it simple.

You may have some great feedback, and we always love to hear from our readers. If you are interested you can also search homes by CLICKING HERE. We are also able to give you a FREE analysis of the current value of your home.

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